Left with Pictures have shared the video for their new song, Terra Firma; check it out below.

Their new album, Afterlife, is released on April 29th on Organ Grinder Records.

Left with Pictures are a pop ensemble formed in London in 2005. Three classically trained musicians who climbed out of the orchestra pit and up into their keyboardists’ loft. Synths, guitars, kazoos and a budget are their instruments of choice. Armed with these, they began a series of impromptu gigs in bars, bedrooms and theatres.

Since being signed to Organ Grinder Records in 2008, the lads have since released two albums: Beyond Our Means (2009) and In Time (2011), the latter of which consisted of 12 songs that were released monthly, and debuted on BBC 6 Music by Gideon Coe. They have gained critical acclaim over 10 years and refined their signature brand of intricate pop music, where the electric and the acoustic are melded together beautifully.

Afterlife is their first release in five years: the sound of a band evolving, taking their style down new avenues of musical exploration. Thanks, in part, to the choosing of Richard Formby as production maestro. Formby confronted and destroyed any comfort zones the band may have slipped into during their 10 years together, as Tom Walker put it: “Richard’s job as producer was often to gently unpick what we’d done and refocus it. He encouraged us to change arrangements in the studio –often stripping parts away and leaving a broader, more cinematic sound. Richard is a master of vintage equipment – modular synths, old organs, tape delays, etc. – and he always had ideas about which sounds to use and how to distort, bend and re-imagine the music we made.”

Photo by Jonathan Hyde
https://www.flickr.com/photos/jonathanhyde/

The new album’s lyrical themes touch on some harsh topics like death and renewal. Indeed, Bloody Mess, doesn’t beat around the bush with the line; “I don’t know what my body will to do me today / I’m scared to go to sleep tonight.” While Terra Firma is quite blatantly about dying, it climaxes with a folk/electronic/symphonic melding of sounds, all of which is preceded with the lyric; “It’s easy to go on without a life you know nothing about, when you spend your days at the water’s edge.”

Afterlife has a much more lived-in sound than the bands’ previous works, owing to the fact that the band have matured and grown ever-so-slightly older.

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