FLASHBACK FRIDAY Review: The Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask

FLASHBACK FRIDAY Review: The Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask

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by Katie Glover

In 1998, a game that changed the way people viewed games came out on the Nintendo 64 console. It was viewed as revolutionary and has been on many ‘Top XX Games of All Time’ lists. The game? The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. It was such a game changer that the developer, Zelda creator Shigeru Miyamoto, wanted to create a remastered and extended version for the next instalment, named Ura Zelda. But, someone on the team that put it together, Eiji Anouma, had other ideas. He was given a year to create a new and unique Zelda game, and wouldn’t have to work on the Ura Zelda game in the meantime. And thus, Majora’s Mask was born.

The game’s plot revolves around the protagonist, Link, as he searches the Lost Woods for a friend (believed to be his old fairy Navi from Ocarina of Time) and ends up in Termina, a parallel universe to Hyrule, the series’ main setting. He soon learns that the world is cursed and doomed to be destroyed in 3 days’ time. The antagonist, an imp named Skull Kid, must be stopped from destroying the world by retrieving the mask he’s wearing, known as Majora’s Mask. It’s said that Majora’s Mask contains the spirit of an ancient demon. After being cursed and losing his precious ocarina, Link must retrieve it to be able to free himself from his cursed form. When this is done, he must then free the giants trapped in the bodies of four monsters on each corner of the map. Using songs on his ocarina and masks he acquires from different people and tasks, he must save Termina.

The game is very well made for being made in a year. It’s nice that everyone is important and useful for something. Some of the sidequests are tedious, but the payout is worth it. If you go to the trouble of collecting all the masks, you get a special mask at the end of the game and it makes it much easier to fight the final boss. There’s a lot to do in Termina, even though it’s not a huge world. The soundtrack is amazing. All of the music really captures the feel of its respective area. It’s got its moments where it’s difficult, but figuring out the puzzles is half the fun. Overall, it’s an amazing game. Even the main complaint people have, the time limit, fits in with the game and that, in my opinion, makes up for feeling rushed in some parts. It’s a very well-made game for only being made in a year—a very short amount of time for game design back then. Overall, I give it 9/10 stars.